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Now What?

April 19, 2017

We’ve been having a bit of a problem with data as we travel further down into the Exumas. This lack of connectivity has given us lots of time for reading (post-apocalyptic novels, anyone?) and thinking about what’s next for us. While we would love nothing more than to continue on to Puerto Rico before hurricane season, we’ve come to the conclusion that we have more work to do on our boat before we can make that crossing. So with this in mind, we’re making the most of our time in the Bahamas before it’s time to head back to the States.

We were looking forward to going to George Town later this week, but we’ve decided to head north to Eleuthera and the Abacos instead. While making our plans to head farther south we both realized we were dreading the trip down. Neither of us relishes the idea of heading 50 miles south to George Town for a few days, only to get stuck there for a few weeks. The weather pattern has been a few days of calm winds, quickly followed by howling winds for a week or more. So wherever you go, you’d better be prepared to stay there for a while. Not that George Town would be the worst place to be stuck, it’s the capitol of the Exumas and it sounds like there’s a lot going on there. But we’ve spent a lot of time in the Exumas now and we’re ready for something new, so north it is. Maybe along the way we’ll figure out what’s next when we get back to the States…

Meanwhile, we had a blast on our stop at Gaulin Cay, where we spotted an osprey on his perch high atop a rocky crag and met a gaggle of iguanas on the beach. We also saw not one but two wrecks: Two sad-looking sailboat hulls belonging to someone who’d hoped they could ride out one of the recent hurricanes. Sadly, they weren’t so lucky.

If you look closely, you can see the osprey high up on the cliff wall, just below his nest.

We really dug Gaulin Cay!

You can just see Mata Hari anchored in the distance.

There were a ton of iguanas, a couple who were a tad aggressive. I kept my distance!

Still can’t get over how pretty the water is…

We stopped in Black Point, which is the second-largest town in the Exumas after George Town, but still crazy small at around 400 people. The settlement is known for its welcoming vibe and the folks there were very kind indeed. We also got to pay a visit to the dump, always high on a cruiser’s checklist since there’s nowhere to dispose of trash while you’re on a boat. We feed any food waste to the fishes, but bottles, cans, and plastic are challenging. So often it’s out of sight out of mind when it comes to trash, but for places like the Bahamas where recycling doesn’t exist, everything, including plastic is burned to address issues of sanitation and vermin. The infrastructure for trash removal that we have back home, simply doesn’t exist here. Factor in cruisers who hop off their boats with bags of garbage to get rid of and you’ve got a lot of trash to burn.

One of two sailboats we saw washed ashore. Hurricanes suck. Also, witness the weirdest house we’ve seen in the Bahamas…

Trash is a problem in the Bahamas, even tiny settlements like Black Point, where cruisers like us add to the accumulation.

A few days later we anchored around the corner at White Point with two other boats, Alex on Vesta and Don and Gwen on Tackless Too. We invited everyone over for dinner one night and wound up having an awesome Easter dinner a few nights later at Don and Gwen’s that went into the wee hours, a real rarity in cruising life where most of us are in bed soon after the sun goes down. The wind howled for a few days, keeping us hunkered down there until it quieted down. With it so breezy there wasn’t much else to do during the day but read (Stephen King’s The Stand for me, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road for Rich). I also baked cookies and made kimchi. If it weren’t for our new friends (and Stephen King), I’d be going a lot more stir crazy!

Kimchi! We’re finding this is the best way to keep crunchy, delicious produce on a boat.